This page is a searchable version of the original archive page found here:
http://www.mission-texas.com/library/about%20us.htm

“For over 20 years, official reports have

consistently indicated the presence of elevated levels of

chemicals in and around the neighborhoods of

Mission, Texas. This region has a history of chemical

manufacturing within residential sections of the town, as

well as high incidences of human illness and disease

in the neighboring community. Both the state and

federal governments have actively monitored the

environment and studied the population for several

decades. Despite all the research, to date no formal

effort has been made to address the needs of the

affected community. For years the focus has been on the

dirt instead of the people.”

 

 

A Word from the Author

 

This site is an historical archive of the Mission environmental justice movement and is the rebirth of the Mission Texas Coalition movement and website, which was established in 2004 and composed of Mission residents, activists, organizers, social justice organizations, and student activist groups.  This site is a compilation of news, reports (official and academic), multimedia works, and collections of reflections regarding the contamination of Mission, Texas and the experiences of the affected community.  This site is aimed at contributing to the success of the residents of Mission, Texas and all others involved in getting the government and other responsible parties to rectify environmental/human injustices related to toxic exposure.

 

 

To learn more about the history behind the www.mission-texas.com/library/ website, please click here to read the bio.

 

If you would like to add articles (of any medium) to this archive, please contact [email protected]/library/.

 

 

Proposed solutions for the community of Mission, Texas

 

Appropriate health care and financial assistance for healthcare related costs

  • Free health exams for the community

  • Biomarkers (blood tests to determine contaminants in the bloodstream)

  • Intervention for the residents of the areas where chemical spills occurred (train, vehicle)

  • Intervention for the residents of chemical dump sites

  • Medical vouchers

  • Establish clinics

  • Counseling

  • Education on the overall situation and its repercussions for the community and public

  • Compensation for mental and physical anguish

  • Meet human needs

 

Buyout and relocation

  • Compensation for the lowered property value, past and present

  • Funds for complete relocation

  • Declaration of disaster area

  • Cap and fence all affected areas to prevent any future damage

 

The Science Behind Mission, Texas

 

Click here to see a list of contaminants found in Mission and their reported effects.

 

Click here to see the “Dirty Dozen”, which the UN declared the “most hazardous contaminants known to man”.

8 of the 12 contaminants listed were produced in Mission, Texas.

 

See our STUDIES page for more in depth information.

 

Personal Stories

 

This issue is a deep and extremely personal one for all who are affected.  The situation and living conditions the affected residents are subjected to are harsh and continue to persist.  You can read about Baby Sara, Oscar and Rolando, or Mr. Solis.  These stories show the human side of this situation.    Also visit our Pictures page.

 

You can also read The Killing Fields of Texas or December’s entries in La Platica for more specifics about the situation overall.

 

There are more multimedia projects and stories in the works, so please check back for updates.

 

The Lawsuit:

C-4885-99; 332nd District Court, Hidalgo County

The following list of files contains the Second Amended Original Petition for the case, which is 103 pages long:

Original Petition 1 (Mostly Plaintiffs names)

Original Petition 2 (Verbiage for Petition begins on page 15)

Original Petition 3

Original Petition 4

Defendant(s)
ALLIED CHEMICAL CORPORATION
AMERICAN HOME PRODUCTS CORPORA, TION D/B/A AMERICAN CYANAMID CO
ATOFINA CHEMICALS, INC. F/K/A
AVENTIS PHARMACEUTICALS F/K/A, INC.E POULENC
BASF CORPORATION D/B/A DELAWAR, E MEW CORPORATION
CHEVRON CHEMICAL COMPANY LLC
DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY
E.I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS COMPAN, Y
EARTH TECH, INC. F/K/A
FMC CORPORATION
HAYES-SAMMONS COMPANY, HAYES-SAMMONS CHEMICAL
HELENA CHEMICAL COMPANY
HERCULES INCORPORATED
KER-MCGEE CHEMICAL LLC A/K/A K, ERR-MCGEE CHEMICAL C ORP.
LOS ANGELES CHEMICAL COMPANY
MAXUS ENERGY CORPORATION F/K/A, DIAMOND SHAMROCK CO RPORATION
MONSANTO COMPANY F/K/A MONSANT, O AGRICULTURAL COMPA NY
MONTROSE CHEMICAL CORPORATION
NOVARTIS PHARMACEUTICALS CORPO, RATION F/K/A CIBA-GE IGY CORPORA
OCCIDENTAL CHEMICAL CORPORATIO, N F/K/A HOOKER CHEMI CAL CORPORA
PHARMACIA CORPORATION F/K/A MO, NSANTO CHEMICAL COMP ANY
ROHM AND HAAS COMPANY
SHELL CHEMICAL LP F/K/A SHELL, CHEMICAL COMPANY
SHELL OIL COMPANY
TEX-AG COMPANY
TEX-AG PROPERTIES COMPANY
UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION
UNION PACIFIC RAIROAD COMPANT
URS CORPORATION D/B/A URS GREI, NER WOODWARD CLYDE
VELSICOL CHEMICAL CORPORATION

Plaintiff(s) represented by:
RAMON GARCIA     Bar Number:  07641800     (956) 383-7441
(representing: ACEVEDO, ALICIA IND)

Defendant(s) represented by:
ROBERT G. NEWMAN     Bar Number:  14965600     270-7138
(representing: ALLIED CHEMICAL CORPORATION)
JOSE A. (TONY) CANALES     Bar Number:  03737000     883-0601
(representing: AMERICAN HOME PRODUCTS CORPORA, TION D/B/A AMERICAN CYANAMID CO)
DAVID G. OLIVEIRA     Bar Number:  15254675     542-5666
(representing: ATOFINA CHEMICALS, INC. F/K/A)
ROBERT G. NEWMAN     Bar Number:  14965600     270-7138
(representing: AVENTIS PHARMACEUTICALS F/K/A, INC.E POULENC )
RICHARD L. JOSEPHSON     Bar Number:  11031500     229-1460
(representing: BASF CORPORATION D/B/A DELAWAR, E MEW CORPORATION )
SCOTT, ROBERT     Bar Number:  17911800     (713) 228-6601
(representing: CHEVRON CHEMICAL COMPANY LLC)
RICARDO G. CEDILLO     Bar Number:  04043600     822-6666
(representing: E.I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS COMPAN, Y )
MICHAEL B. HUGHES     Bar Number:  10227200     (409) 763-2481
(representing: EARTH TECH, INC. F/K/A)
ROBERT G. NEWMAN     Bar Number:  14965600     270-7138
(representing: FMC CORPORATION)
ROBERT LEE SOZA JR.     Bar Number:  18869300     242-4618
(representing: HELENA CHEMICAL COMPANY)
DAVID G. OLIVEIRA     Bar Number:  15254675     542-5666
(representing: HERCULES INCORPORATED)
MICHAEL J. MAZZONE     Bar Number:  13313000     547-2115
(representing: KER-MCGEE CHEMICAL LLC A/K/A K, ERR-MCGEE CHEMICAL C ORP.)
ROBERT G. NEWMAN     Bar Number:  14965600     270-7138
(representing: MAXUS ENERGY CORPORATION F/K/A, DIAMOND SHAMROCK CO RPORATION)
EDWARD MORGAN CARSTARPHEN III     Bar Number:  03906700     647-6800
(representing: MONSANTO COMPANY F/K/A MONSANT, O AGRICULTURAL COMPA NY)
STEVEN S. REILLEY     Bar Number:  00791502     658-0880
(representing: MONTROSE CHEMICAL CORPORATION)
MARGARET TWOMEY BRENNER     Bar Number:  02958050     221-3305
(representing: ROHM AND HAAS COMPANY)
RICHARD L. JOSEPHSON     Bar Number:  11031500     229-1460
(representing: SHELL CHEMICAL LP F/K/A SHELL, CHEMICAL COMPANY )
RICHARD L. JOSEPHSON     Bar Number:  11031500     229-1460
(representing: SHELL OIL COMPANY)
ROBERT RANDALL CRANE     Bar Number:  05006980     618-8083
(representing: TEX-AG COMPANY)
ROBERT RANDALL CRANE     Bar Number:  05006980     618-8083
(representing: TEX-AG PROPERTIES COMPANY)
NORTON A. COLVIN JR.     Bar Number:  04632100     542-7441
(representing: UNION PACIFIC RAIROAD COMPANT)
NORTON A. COLVIN JR.     Bar Number:  04632100     542-7441
(representing: URS CORPORATION D/B/A URS GREI, NER WOODWARD CLYDE )

 

 

Supporting the philosophy of the United Nations:

 

DEFINING ADEQUACY ON A GLOBAL SCALE

Source:  United Nations Human Settlements Program

 

“Adequate shelter means more than a roof over one’s head.  It also means adequate privacy; adequate space; physical accessibility;  adequate security; security of tenure; structural stability and durability; adequate lighting, heating and ventilation; adequate basic  infrastructure, such as water-supply, sanitation and waste management facilities; suitable environmental quality and health-related factors; and adequate and accessible location with regard to work and basic facilities: all of which should be available at an affordable cost.  Adequacy should be determined together with the people concerned, bearing in mind the prospect for gradual development.

 

Adequacy often varies from country to country, since it depends on specific cultural, social, environmental and economic factors.  Gender-specific and age-specific factors, such as the exposure of children and women to toxic substances, should be considered in this context.”